From Wounds To Wisdom

Collective trauma is upon us. As a society, we have encountered destructive pain over and over again. The time is now. How do we heal together?

In my experience, the healing process begins when something painful is ready to be seen, heard, acknowledged … and even loved. When I’m courageous, I can dive deeper into the pain, curiously explore, and breathe life into it.

I believe most of us have worked diligently to awaken spiritually and heal our personal wounds. What happens when we apply our healing wisdom together? We have all the tools and awareness in our group consciousness to transform and free ourselves together.

Personally, when I’ve experienced debilitating pain, I find it helpful to be present to it, to listen to it, to be gentle with myself, to accept myself, to investigate and breathe with the pain, to untangle confusion and explore what needs to change, and then to nourish integration by recognizing the whole. Ahhh, lots to love.

What needs to change?

Our entanglements and resistance to change can cause confusion and more suffering. For the last few years I’ve been practicing, learning, and training to be a facilitator of constellations through MN Center for Systemic Constellations. It is profound work! It helps untangle confusion, bring greater understanding, and restore the orders of love. See more below for a perspective from Bert Hellinger, the grandfather of Constellations, and author of Love’s Hidden Symmetry.

What can you do?  Let’s be curious and courageously explore together.

Join a moving conversation! 

See more here

Or become an agent to change. 

See more here

Contact Julie@move-as-one.com for more information

Be peace, Julie

A note from Julie:

Each of us is a living, breathing and walking ecosystem, a movement of nature. When we move in rhythm with our natural ecosystem, we remember our intuitive wisdom and the joy of creating from our wholesome, interconnected nature.

In Bert Hellinger’s book, Love’s Hidden Symmetry, he writes:

“People have a strong tendency to use their strength to hold on to their problems and to avoid solutions … Finding solutions to our problems is threatening and unpleasant because it carries the inherent fear of losing our belonging, of feelings of guilt and betrayal, of falling out of favor, of breaking faith with a group to which we belong … Therefore, finding solutions to our problems is threatening and unpleasant. Resolution and happiness seems dangerous because we believe they’ll make us lonely. Problems and unhappiness, on the other hand, give a feeling of belonging. Because of this dynamic, solutions are often accompanied by guilt, and change requires the courage to face that guilt.

From a systemic point of view, problems are unsuccessful attempts to love, and the love that maintains the problems can be redirected to resolve it. By finding the point at which we can love, then the problem dissolves, and the same love that maintained the problem solves it.”

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